Sports

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    Water vs. Mainstream Sports Drinks

    The television flips to a commercial and an athlete, dripping sweat takes the screen. A narrator, one with a deep and motivational voice, begins to speak, introducing the power of sweat, what power lies behind it, and where the power to keep going comes from: Gatorade. The 2014 “Sweat it. Get it.” commercial by the well-known sports drink company promotes replenishing of fluids and electrolytes lost in the production of sweat. According to Fitday, Gatorade is highly recommended for athletes who partake in extreme level activities and sports. Enhancements are mixed in the beverage, providing energy for tired athletes through potassium, sodium, and a balanced level of carbohydrates. Other sports drinks, such as Powerade, offer the same enhancements, but with more vitamins than the original Gatorade formula. Either way, both are flavored and designed to keep you drinking more, especially after extreme physical activities. Water is, of course, another suggested fluid source. Hydration is key and water keeps that need balanced. When 60% of your body is made up of water, it’s something you should pay attention to. Water takes care of your body, protects your spine, and delivers oxygen to your heart (and everywhere else). Depending on how long and strenuous your workout is, stick to water if you’re doing a basic, routine workout that lasts up to two hours. After that point, a replenishing drink might be reasonable to keep your body going. Yet, depending on what you’re hoping to achieve with your time at the gym, Gatorade could be a negative addition. According to Live Strong, in one 20 ounce Gatorade there are 34 grams of sugar. Grams make that seem small, so convert that to about seven teaspoons. If you’re there to work off the buildup of sugars, Gatorade won’t be your best bet. Gatorade was intended for the athletically inclined, meant to improve and enhance the truly dedicated. We have to consider that, although Gatorade has made a lasting statement past the world of sports and fitness, people were able to survive athletic events with water. We can still do that today. Put the sports drinks down, and pick up some H₂O.
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    GFU Football Lands in “Sports Illustrated” By Melissa Harris

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    November 19, 2014
    Ryan White, a local freelance journalist, contacted Sarah Reid, the Director of Sports Marketing at George Fox University, and pitched the idea of writing an article in Sports Illustrated on behalf of the new GFU football program. White’s goal was to highlight a football program that is making a positive impact in the world of football. The article begins with stories of other college football teams coming under national scrutiny, and uses GFU as a positive counterpoint for what the world of college football should look like. White interviewed Robin Baker who had insight as to what he thinks college football should be. White describes Baker’s ideas as “an endearing tableau: college football that looks like the idea of college football, with student athletes reading books and pursuing real majors, and maybe, wearing letterman sweaters.” As the Director of GFU Sports Marketing, Sarah Reid has a vision for GFU sports programs that closely reflect the vision of President Baker.  Reid stated in a recent interview, “No student is given money to play football or any other sport. GFU has protected the purity of athletics as we teach our athletes to to focus on their intended study and not on trying to be a professional athlete. We are trying to create a community between the students, instructors and alumni through our sporting events, while teaching them leadership. I think Division III could save athletics in the world.” GFU is a Division III school, which means that the athletes do not receive scholarships to play sports. If an athlete receives a scholarship, it is based solely on academic performance, not athletic ability. While there is much discussion as to why GFU decided to start a program in the midst of the current negative press, journalist Ryan White gives his own insight on this discussion at the end of his article. White states, “Why start a college football team in 2014? Because the game won’t be a minor league ATM at George Fox. It’ll be a sepia-toned piece of genuine Americana… Not the sport so hotly debated these days, but the one that makes millions dig ratty sweatshirts from their closet each September”. The magazine article about GFU in “Sports Illustrated” was originally supposed to run in the issue before the new season of Bruin football began. The magazine bumped the article to the next issue due to their coverage of Notre Dame Football players and allegations of academic cheating.      

    Making the Olympics means more to Oregonians

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    November 18, 2014
    We’ve all heard of speed skater Apolo Ohno, big-time swimmer Michael Phelps, or figure skater Yuna Kim. These three Olympians have engraved themselves into history by their own achievements, but they also have been successful models for aspiring athletes, even those who compete with disabilities. The Special Olympics is an international organization, but Oregon has really invested in these athletes. Today, 12,000 Oregon athletes take part in the games. Oregon’s branch works hard to offer inclusion in the Special Olympics program to anyone who is eligible to compete. In most cases, these athletes take on a hard-core training course that lasts eight weeks. Sponsoring celebrities might make an appearance, as Michael Phelps occasionally does through his position as a Special Olympic Global Ambassador. Apart from the Special Olympic contributions he makes, Phelps has created a self-titled, non-profit foundation to promote the benefits and athleticism of young swimmers. Speed skater and decorated Olympian Apollo Ohno also has invested himself in the Special Olympics by hosting skating classes for the athletes. Yuna Kim, also a Global Ambassador for the Special Olympics, has provided classes and courses, too. At the Special Olympics in Oregon, everyone is a volunteer: coaches, supporting individuals, or present sponsors. When it comes to training and investing in the athletes, everyone takes on an influential role. The Gold Medals awarded to the athletes make them heroes, and the people volunteering behind the scenes make such heroism possible.   http://www.soor.org/ http://www.specialolympics.org/

    Local Sports Wrap Up

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    November 10, 2014
    This column covers recaps, game scores, highlights and some interviews of the wide variety of professional and semi-professional sports team in Oregon. Here is an overview of the teams and a general introduction for those who may be new to the state. The Portland Timbers | Portland’s major league soccer team They are currently ranked sixth in the Western Conference, with their next home game coming up on Oct 25 against FC Dallas. The team was founded in 1975, as a part of the North American Soccer League. Their mascot is Timber Joey, a real lumberjack who totes a real chainsaw.   The Portland Thorns | Portland’s professional women’s soccer team They started out as part of the National Women’s Soccer League in 2013, winning the league’s first ever national championship title. Their 2014 season is currently over, but many of the American players have been named to the 2014 USA women’s national team.   The Portland Trailblazers | Portland’s professional basketball team Pre-season rankings put them in fourth in the NBA Western Conference, and their next game is coming up on Oct 21 against the Denver Nuggets. Their mascot is Blaze the trail cat.   The Hillsboro Hops | Hillsboro’s minor league baseball team. The Hops are the Class A affiliate of the Arizona Diamondbacks. They are currently out of season, but finished off this year with a win over the Vancouver Canadians to clinch the Northwest League Conference title. This is especially noteworthy, because the Hops are only in their second year of existence.   The Portland Winterhawks | Portland’s major junior league ice hockey team The team ranges in age from about 17-20. They have their next game against the Regina Pats on Oct. 21, and are coming off a four year Western Conference championship streak.   The Portland Thunder | Portland’s arena football team Their inaugural season has just finished, and they won five total games.

    GFU Athletes Receive NWC Student-Athletes of the Week

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    November 7, 2014
    Sophomore Sydney Maluenda and Senior Kody Tarbell were both named the Northwest Conference Student-Athletes of the week. Maluenda earned medalist honors at the Culturame Classic golf invitational held at The Reserve Vineyards and Golf Course the weekend of Oct. 11 and 12 in Aloha, Ore. Maluenda shot a two-day total of 145 (73-72) to edge out the runners up by a single stroke. Not only was she the lone player to shoot under par with her performance on Sunday, she also led her team to a 13-stroke victory over six teams. Maluenda also posted the tournament low, beating four Division I golfers from the University of Oregon, earning her a spot on the All-Tournament team. “I looked at playing with UO girls as a learning experience, a way to challenge myself,” said Maluenda. “That’s the way I look at every round, as a way to get better regardless of who is in the field. I played against the course and embraced the challenge of the day.” Meanwhile, Tarbell finished second at the Wes Cook/GFU Cross Country Invitational at the Willamette Mission State Park in Brooks, Ore. His 25.54.8 time led his team to a fourth place finish and was the personal best time of his career. Tarbell and the GFU cross country team competed against seven other teams in the meet, which included over 55 runners. “I am really happy about my performance this last weekend,” said Tarbell. “It feels good that I was able to compete with the top guys in the meet and have a race that demonstrated the amount of work I had put into this season to help the team. I am really honored to be awarded for the week and looking forward to what I can do going forward.” Maluenda, along with the rest of the women’s golf team, will take the course on again on Oct. 25 and 26 to close their season. Tarbell and his cross country team will race again Oct. 18 at the Lewis and Clark Invitational.

    Local Sports Wrap Up - 10/20/2014

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    November 7, 2014
    Portland Trailblazers. The Blazers lost their most recent preseason game to the Los Angeles Lakers 94-86. C.J. McCollum led the team in scoring  with 17 points, while Thomas Robinson led in rebounds, accumulating 7. After coming off a win against Denver, the Blazers sat four of their five regular starters against the Lakers. This loss puts Portland at 3-3 in preseason exhibitions. Their next game kicks off the regular season against the Oklahoma City Thunder on Oct 29. Portland Timbers. The Timbers lost their last game against C.D. Olimpia 3-1, putting them out of the CONCACAF Champions League Tournament. Midfielder Ben Zemanski scored Portland’s only goal on a deflected shot from the midfield in the fifty second minute. Portland’s last game of the season will occur on Oct. 25 against FC Dallas. Portland Winterhawks. The Winterhawks lost their last game to the Swift Current Broncos 5-4. They made a big third period comeback, but were unable to recover after a late goal by the Broncos with 12.6 seconds to go. Their next game will be on Oct 30, against Kelowna, at home.

    Paying to see the habits that form 'perfection'.

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    November 6, 2014
    Floyd Mayweather, a professional boxer, is the world’s top paid athlete, earning $105 million during his last year alone, according to Forbes. Mayweather has earned around $420 million from his fighting career.  Following Mayweather, professional soccer player Cristiano Ronaldo sits on a pot of $80 million, next to the well-known LeBron James and his $72 million from different agreements with numerous companies. Mayweather, Ronaldo, and James are only three professional athletes. Tiger Woods, David Beckham, or Usain Bolt could be added to the list, and the revenue of all those athletes put together would keep getting higher and higher.  Females aren’t excluded, such as professional soccer player Mia Hamm, skier Lindsay Vohn, or swimmer Missy Franklin, as they are just as talented and decorated athletes. Why are athletes spoiled for their perfection of a talent and paid implausible amounts of money? Some say that there is such a thing as innate talent, a raw skill that appears natural to those who have it. Others take the nurture route, saying between age two and four is the time where a child picks up and is attracted to the natural talents and things that he or she could eventually perfect because of their practice at a young age. While gymnast Shawn Johnson took her first gymnastics class when she was three years old, others like Michael Phelps began swimming around age seven. Some are just accustomed an athlete’s lifestyle, like Kobe Bryant, who grew up following and eventually going beyond his father’s footsteps in the NBA. If a childhood practice or lifestyle is the route to becoming a professional athlete, then we’re just endorsing people for their habits and success of those habits. Professional football players weren’t paid more than $400 in the 1920’s, according to Firmex. At that time in history, most people had an average salary of $5,000. Occasionally, a few major athletes would stand out of the crowd with a $20,000 to $80,000 salary, but those were often iconic stars of the world, such as the famous baseball player Babe Ruth, golfer Bobby Jones, or Gertrude Ederle, who was the first woman to swim the English Channel. The major bump up of salaries began in the 60’s and 70’s, when new media increased exposure, advertising made sports more lucrative, and free agency shifted the dispensation of wealth. As the numbers shot up, hockey player Bobby Hull and baseball star David Parker both signed the dotted line for million dollar contracts for their respective teams. Today there’s no punch or surprise that comes with the billion dollar contracts and endorsements deals. If you’re a successful athlete and catch the right attention, chances are the money will come to you. Professional athletes are paid on the basis that people want to watch them play. People want to see these icons do what they do best. Even if it’s a habit they’ve practiced since being born, that’s the routine they come to know for the rest of their life, especially if it’s something they love. Since people want to see them play, companies recognize a rising star and offer those deals left and right, using athletes to promote their products and make themselves money through the action and lifestyle of another. We believe “perfection” is a thing and when we think we’ve found it, though it may be within someone else, we chase after it anyways because no one wants to be left out of the possibility of “perfect.” While Mayweather was born into a family made of boxers and was motivated by the talent his grandmother saw in him. He spent almost every day at the gym with his dad, even as a toddler. Ronaldo (the boy pictured above) had a bit of a different route, born into poverty where his father was a gardener and his mother was a cook and maid. Eventually, Ronaldo was introduced to the game of soccer, using it as a release from anything else. Both roads led to financial success for these particular two professional athletes, paid to do what they do best. Environment and genetics may have played a part, but besides their perfected habit, they rely on their viewers and publicity to make their dough for them.

    Bruins Battle Against Number Two in NWC

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    November 4, 2014
    The men’s soccer team sent the game into overtime after battling against the number two-ranked team in the Northwest Conference, Whitworth University. Freshman forward Joab Logan led the Bruins, scoring their one and only goal of the game. After outshooting the Pirates 10-3 in the first half, the Bruins were unable to get past Whitworth goalkeeper Tony Watters, who recorded three saves in the game. “We battled hard and rose to our opponent,” said Logan. “We took control and gained confidence. I know with that rise in confidence in myself, I was able to attack more creatively and with that it produced a goal. This is just a little glimpse to what our team can do.” Logan found the net and scored the first goal of the game in the 76th minute of the second period, putting GFU ahead of the Pirates by one goal. The Pirates fired back late in the game, scoring in the 87th minute, forcing the game into overtime. The intensity ended quickly when the Pirates scored a golden goal in the 91st minute and took the 2-1 victory over the Bruins. “Throughout the season, the team has become more comfortable and confident,” said junior forward Angelo Florez. “Now we are at the point where we can compete with top level teams such as Whitworth. All that is needed is for us to clean up the minor mistakes and finish our opportunities as we move forward.” The Bruins are now 2-13-1 and 0-11-0 in conference.

    Local Sports Wrap Up, Blazers Win

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    November 4, 2014
    Portland Trailblazers. The Blazers won their last game against the Oklahoma City Thunder, 109 to 89. This win puts the team at 14 straight opening night victories, tying the Boston Celtics for the NBA record. They got off to a slow start but were able to find their rhythm in the second half. The Blazers’ next game will be against the Cleveland Cavaliers tonight at the Moda Center. Portland Timbers. The Timbers finished off their 2014 season with a 2-0 win over FC Dallas on Oct 25. Darlington Nagbe scored his first goal of the season on a deflected strike, putting the Timbers ahead in the 43rd minute. Striker Maximiliano Urruti added another at 82 minutes. Portland Winterhawks. After coming off a 5-2 win over the Prince Albert Raiders, the Winterhawks fell 0-5 to the Kelowna Rockets on Oct 30. The Raiders scored early in the 52 second, setting the tone for a shut-out against the Winterhawks. Their next match will be against the Red Deer Rebels at home.

    Domestic Violence in Sports Intro

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    November 3, 2014
    Domestic violence is an issue that unfortunately intertwined with sports. Even though the severity of the cases vary from person to person, all the players, coaches, and others who have been convicted of such cases have a one common denominator: their effect on the audience. Where there is fame, there can be fortune – but there are always, be definition, fans. And for major sports fans, when any act of violence or crime is committed by a player on their favorite team, it can seem to hit straight into the heart. In the next few weeks, my focus will be to cover the aspects of different sports and how different players are treated based on their popularity, position on the team, and other key factors. For some sports fans, the media can cover too much of the athletes’  relationship with the law, and for other people the media does not cover enough. The question, then: How much do we want to know? How much do we have a responsibility to know? It follows that most people have the same opinion that well-off people who make their living by sports: they should not get special treatment when it comes to legality. Yet, there are also those who may have believe that having every aspect of the athlete’s personal life broadcasted everywhere on social media is enough punishment in itself. It’s difficult to say who is right or who is wrong in believing either side; however, it is important to think about the domestic cases that aren’t shown on the 5 p.m. news. When it comes down to it, there are cases dealing with child abuse, domestic abuse, illegal drug use and activity that happen everyday in the lives of “ordinary people.” The question is not whether social media coverage should be an issue. The question is, are the athletes receiving the proper court sentence for the act they have been convicted of committing?

    Domestic Violence In Baseball

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    November 3, 2014
    As unfortunate as domestic violence cases are in the general population, it is important to shine light onto the areas of professional sports , considering the publicity surrounding domestic violence cases and learning from them. For example, Major League Baseball. With the recent events of some NFL stars being suspended from games for different charges, including domestic violence, Major League Baseball has taken the time to go over its domestic violence policies. The players’ union met  in September to establish a formal discipline plan for anyone implicated in domestic violence cases. Professional baseball has had its fair share of players being charged with domestic violence. For example, Brian Giles faced charges in 2006, and battery charges were also filed against Milton Bradley. Yet up until this union meeting there were not any set disciplinary actions to have taken place. No suspensions, fines, nothing. Now, with the NFL taking major action with their players, the MLB can no longer overlook their athletes involved in domestic violence, and are trying to make their policy deter players from acting out violently. Even with the negativity linked with domestic violence, it is nice to see that people are professional teams learning from each other and taking a second look at themselves, trying to find ways to prevent the spread of domestic violence among athletes at the professional level.