Feature

  • The Myth of Bigfoot

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    April 17, 2014
    Living in Washington, I was aware that I was in the rumored home of Bigfoot. Specifically I was not, though, since I lived on a hill overlooking a valley south of Seattle and was cornered by two highways. There was no way Bigfoot would be found anywhere near my home. I had heard the rumors and stories though. As a child, I went on hikes in the mountains with my family. My siblings and I would joke about what was beyond the trail or outside our camping trailer. I have never been to the Olympic region of Washington where I believe Bigfoot is probably more likely to live. Despite this, the myth lives. I grew up familiar with the tape and conspiracies surrounding Bigfoot. There was more than one instance where people had pretended to be the beast and the incident where someone chopped up an animal and dressed it up like Bigfoot and put it in a freezer. The fact that that made it onto the news says something: about what the news or about the people who did it, I’m not so sure. Even though many theories of Bigfoot roaming the lands have been said to lack evidence or substance, the myth lives on. People are still on the lookout for him. Some people take it more seriously than others, and from this has spurned a TV show about people on the lookout for poor Bigfoot. Bigfoot has been a part of culture for longer than we may guess. The idea and name of the Bigfoot we know today originated in the 50’s. Before then the idea of hairy wild men was prevalent. The actual first written account of big hairy men in America was documented by Leif Erikson; of course this was not near the Pacific Northwest. Native American Tribes in certain areas across America also had myths of big, hairy creatures and had reported sightings up to the mid-20th century. Bigfoot has made a long journey from being mentioned all over the world and has been narrowed down to America and into the mountains on both coasts. This is partly because of the building of cities which would have driven the hairy beast into the wilderness. There is no mass acceptance that Bigfoot is real, but that are those that believe that he roams away from society, away from people, probably wishing he could return to a time of owning the land where the city man was not there. If you would like further reading and so see where I got some of my info, look here: http://www.bigfoot-lives.com/html/bigfoot_history.html http://www.todayifoundout.com/index.php/2013/05/the-origin-of-the-bigfoot-legend/ http://www.discoveryuk.com/web/finding-bigfoot/about-the-show/the-legend-of-bigfoot/  

    Movie Trivia Quiz

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    April 17, 2014
    It’s a stressful time of year, so here is a little movie trivia quiz to take your mind off of things for a few moments.   1) In “Frozen,” Elsa was originally intended to be… A) The Villain B) Not in the movie C) A very small role   2) The “Hunger Games: Catching Fire” was the first film with a sole female lead to top the annual box office since… A) 2012 B) 1973 C) 1997   3) “Thor: The Dark World,” is the first Marvel Cinematic Universe Film… A) To create a new language B) To have the hero work together successfully with a villain C) To not be set in the United States   4) In “American Hustle” each main character… A) Was written specifically for an actor or actress B) Was not allowed to improvise C) Had to make drastic changes to their physical appearance to appear in the role   5) “The Amazing Spider-Man” started as… A) Spider-Man 4, a direct sequel to the trilogy B) A one-time tribute to Spider Man released on the 50th anniversary of the comic C) A marketing campaign for marvel   6) In “Despicable me 2” if you call the number agent Lucy Wilde give to Gru you will hear… A) A random person telling you that you have the wrong number B) A recording of Lucy Wilde saying you have reached the anti-villain league C) Nothing, the number doesn’t exist   (Answers: 1:A, 2:B, 3:C, 4:A, 5:A, 6:B)  

    Student Directs Play in Laundromat

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    April 15, 2014
    Cambria Herrera is a sophomore theatre major. She is directing a play April 23-24 called “Third Oak and the Laundromat,” a one-act performance that is a little out of the box—but a piece that is decidedly relevant for the George Fox community. The play is by Marsha Norman and will run approximately forty minutes. The premise is that two women walk into the laundromat at 3 a.m. to escape the problems in their lives, and discover that they have more in common than they thought. “They’re both escaping loneness at home,” said Herrera. “One, her husband passed away, and the other, her husband is cheating on her, so they find their commonality. But that’s not really revealed until they start talking … they both realize they were glad they had the conversation afterwards.” The one-act is a little unorthodox in where it will be performed. Instead of staging the play in Wood-Mar Auditorium, where the theatre department usually performs, it will be set on location in a laundromat. “I’m so excited for so many reasons— the main one being this theme of approaching people that are different from you,” said Herrera. “Doing it in a laundromat really helps that theme, because we’re all going to be sitting around the actors, looking at them and looking at each other.” Herrera has just begun directing this year, and she loves the process of teaching actors how to interpret the text and feel the characters. “I started as an actor—it’s what every director says—but I also like teaching, and I love being an audience member,” said Herrera. “So just getting to watch other people perform and then getting to work with actors and talk to them about what’s going to help them get better is really fun.” Herrera chose Third Oak and the Laundromat because of its relevance and timeliness for the students at George Fox. She acknowledges the number of women actresses who are not always able to perform in the theatre department’s productions and wanted to give them a chance to be a part of a play. She also wanted to find something that would apply to students right now. “I think [it's] the issue of looking at another stranger who is different than you and taking the time to converse with them and be there for them without any judgment,” said Herrera. “I think that’s something that we can all feel.” “Third Oak and the Laundromat” will be performed at the Coin Laundromat on Springbrook road in Newberg on April 23-24 at 10:50 p.m.    

    A Tribute to Mickey Rooney

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    April 14, 2014
    On April 6 Mickey Rooney, a beloved actor, passed away at age 93. His entertainment career spanned nearly his entire lifetime, lasting up until the day of his death. He co-starred many times along side Judy Garland, and was a revered showman. Here is a snap shot of just two of his many films. National Velvet. In this 1944 classic, Mickey Rooney stars along side Elizabeth Taylor as a scared former jockey who agrees to help a young girl named Velvet Brown, played by Elizabeth Taylor, train a wild horse for England’s National Sweepstakes. Rooney himself plays Mi Taylor, a young man who blows into town and finds work as a hired hand in a stable. I recommend this to anyone who enjoys old-fashioned movies, and inspirational stories. In addition, this movie is considered so important it was selected in 2003 to be a part of the United States National Film Registry in the Library of Congress for being culturally, historically, and aesthetically significant. Pete’s Dragon. One of Rooney’s later hits (1977), this children’s story slightly resembles the plot of Mary Poppins or Nanny McPhee. It is, however, wonderful and unique in its own right. Following the journey of a boy with an invisible pet dragon, this film stars Helen Reddy and Mickey Rooney as lighthouse keepers who take in the boy with the dragon, Pete. They protect him from his evil adoptive family, and defend him even when he makes a mess in the town. If you have ever heard the song “Brazzle Dazzle Day” this is where that song comes from. The music in this movie is actually very good if you enjoy musicals, and it is one of the first movies to mix animation and live action.

    Resident Assistant Position Reaffirms Student's Passion for his Field

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    April 7, 2014
    George Fox University junior and psychology major Jared Larson expresses great appreciation for his position as a resident assistant of Lewis apartments; he also finds the role valuable in equipping him for a successful future. Upon setting foot onto campus in the fall of his freshman year, Larson was enthusiastic about the Christian environment the university had to offer. “I wanted to be surrounded by Christian leaders, who would help grow me as a Christian,” says Larson. “My youth pastor always told me that college was a time when people lose their faith. I didn’t want that to be the case for me.” Fully immersing himself in the community, an energetic Larson sought out opportunities to form relationships with those around him, leading him into an RA position his junior year. Far exceeding typical RA expectations, he strove to form a deeper sense of community within his residence area: planning community events, mediating residential conflicts and even providing occasional chocolate chip cookie deliveries to residents’ doors. “One of my goals in life is to be an inspiration unto others,” says Larson. “I just enjoy making my residents feel at home. I like to help and make others feel included and special. I like developing others and showing them the potential that they have in this life” Through his experience in serving at GFU, Larson has only become more sure regarding his goal of becoming a school counselor. “Being an RA has influenced my college experience by helping me develop experiences that will help me with my future career,” he says. “It has definitely helped me see who I am as a person and who I want to be when I am older.” As Larson prepares for his last year as a student, he is delighted at the opportunity to serve as RA of Woolman apartments for the 2014-15 school year. With his self-claimed characteristics of positivity, encouragement and sass he hopes to unite his newest group of residents and leave with memories that he will not be soon to forget.

    Chocolate Brownies Recipe

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    April 7, 2014
    Bored on a Friday night at Fox? Well, what better way to fill those otherwise-meaningless hours than with a brownie baking bonanza? Start out by melting three cups of butter (we actually substituted margarine, and they still worked out great). Lightly beat four eggs, then add the melted butter to the eggs. Combine 2 ¼ cup sugar, 2/3 cup cocoa powder, 1 ¼ cup flour, and 1 teaspoon baking powder. Add the dry ingredients to the wet ingredients then beat with a spoon or spatula. Pour in a 13 by 9 inch pan and bake at 375 degrees for about 25-30 minutes.

    Serve Trip to San Francisco

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    April 7, 2014
    On Saturday March 22, a team of twelve George Fox students embarked on a weeklong trip to the city of San Francisco, Calif. The first day they were in the city, the team was taken to the top of Bruno Hill where they could see the entire city landscaped below them. While they could see the city’s landmarks, like the Golden Gate Bridge, they were there to do more than just tour the city. They were there to serve. “They took us up there to talk about being an agent of Jesus and to give us a holistic idea of where we would be all week. It was a very diverse community,” said Joanna Rocha, one of twelve team members. In this community, the group did a number of diverse projects as well. The students worked with many members of the San Francisco community; many were homeless. They wrote poems and prayers for the city of San Francisco. They also had their eyes opened to the sex trafficking happening in the Tenderloin District in San Francisco as they worked within the organization ReIMAGINE. Rocha said that there were “definitely a lot of moments” throughout the week when God revealed himself to the team, but one of the most prominent was on Wednesday as the team served a meal to the homeless. They cooked and prepared a dinner of spaghetti with brownies for dessert at a Baptist church in town. Once the food was passed out, the students sat with those served and conversed with them. Rocha remembered talking to one man in particular named AJ. “He was 37,” she said, “and I was really able to connect with him. He went through addictions and selling drugs, but had decided to focus on his career. He was at an internship to build skyscrapers. He had two boys and you could tell they were his motivation. He said he was sober for a year, so I had to high five him for that. I had to encourage him.” “It was amazing how easy it was to converse when you remember that every person is a human being,” Rocha added, “even if you didn’t know them. I saw Jesus at work there being able to bring us young students as a source of inspiration and encouragement. It made me think, how many people do we pass by every day that we could connect with?” The group continued to bond through instances of this where they would be walking on the street and would respond to someone’s needs by giving them food or water. Usually these were people others just passed by and ignored, even if they were asking for help. By serving these people, the group was able to bond and share love to those they passed. “The group got along very well,” said Rocha. “We were open with each other and got to know each other as well. Different backgrounds were all coming together to follow in Jesus’ footsteps were really cool. We worked in harmony.” In the end, the key that made this group able to serve was a common love for Christ and, according to Rocha, the ability to do something we all are capable of—listen. “We listened. We really listened. These people had stories,” said Rocha.

    Making Friends With Trolls

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    April 1, 2014
    I was sixteen and staying with family friends in Norway. I saw very quickly the culture of trolls. Not the kind you meet every day on the internet, but the lumpy, bug-eyed version of trolls, the ones that smell Christian blood and haunt the forests and can have multiple heads but nothing in them. You could buy little troll figures in every souvenir store. They smile ugly smiles at every person who walks by. But I had been warned not to mess with trolls; generally I knew better. I met a troll while traveling between two cities in Norway.  My family friends and I stopped to get something to eat and outside the restaurant there was a hill and on top of that hill sat a troll. He waved out at us, holding his walking stick; it was obvious he was a traveler of these hills. Our plan was to go pay the troll a visit after lunch. I said that I did not think the troll would mind, we would be friends. I was sure of it. I was about to make a new friend. With trolls, however, you do not overstep your boundaries. My friend, her dad, and I climbed to the top of the troll’s hill. We stopped there to take a picture and I assured the troll that we were good friends, and I took one more picture. Then we made our way back to the car. On the way down somehow I managed to slip and fall on the uneven hillside. I said I was fine and kept walking. Back at the car my bottom was in a lot of pain from hitting the ground. I asked myself how I fell. I was being very careful. Then I realized, I must have done something to upset the troll. I overstepped my boundary. I did not earn the troll’s friendship, I assumed it. Even if you do not mean to, do not mess with trolls, and do not think that they will not let you know what they think. The myth and idea of trolls is so ingrained into the culture today, you cannot get away from them. Everywhere I went there seemed to be some evidence of them, but I learned that a friendship with Norwegian trolls was something to be earned, because you may just fall and end up with a bruise for the rest of your vacation. If you ever travel to Norway, you will see in random places that a troll has been put there. I do not know if they are for tourists or natives, but the idea of creatures that resides in the country that protect it but have some unscrupulous, possible dangerous sides to them gives it character. The trolls seen around the country may be funny or silly, but they give the culture character. It also shows the power of the myths of trolls that has survived today to give tourists glaring looks over their long noses.  

    Bon Cashier, Jenna Johnson, Keeps Spirits High

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    April 1, 2014
    Bon Appetite employee and widely accepted member of the larger George Fox University community is cashier Jenna Johnson. Johnson first set foot on campus in 2010 after seeking employment within the Bon Appetite food service company. Bon Appetite, though not part of George Fox has provided the university’s students and staff members with food service for many years. Such partnership has allowed employees like Johnson to establish a presence within the student body. “I’ve always enjoyed working here at Fox,” says Johnson. Johnson, unlike most of the community, encounters the large majority of students on a daily basis as she swipes their student identification cards for each and every weekday breakfast or lunch meal eaten in the Bon. “I’ve calculated that I have about three seconds with each student,” says Johnson. “Anytime working with the students is fun. I feel as if I’ve become part of the kids’ lives.” Though Johnson’s encounters with students tend to be limited, it is hoped that she will leave a lasting impression as her positive attitude, enthusiastic greetings and outward celebration of the 500th meal of the day are intended to have an infectious effect on those around her. “I just have the desire to always be positive,” says Johnson. “You decide what to do with the day. It can be a bad or good day. It all depends on how you look at it.” This mindset is nothing new to Johnson as she made the conscious decision to think accordingly many years ago when she was charged with the well-being for her three younger siblings after her mother fell ill. “I’ve been working ever since I was little,” says Johnson. “We were taught to work for performance. I think that is something that is lacking today.” Outside of her work, Johnson keeps a like attitude as she stays busy crocheting, sewing and working in her garden. When it comes to advice Johnson could give to students she says the key component to life is to keep going and not to quit when things get tough. “If you think studies are hard know that life is even harder. Just don’t give up,” says Johnson.

    Pizza Rolls Recipe

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    March 20, 2014
    Craving some pizza but 1) don’t feel like shelling out the cash for a delivery or 2) want to hone your sophisticated culinary skills? Then take heart, friend. These pizza rolls—quick, cheap, and easy to make—are calling your name. You’ll need a can of buttermilk biscuit dough. Take the biscuits and flatten them out into circles.   Add a handful of shredded mozzarella cheese to each. (You could also add some pepperoni or olives at this step.) Fold in the corners of each circle, making little balls of dough. Grease a baking sheet and place the pizza rolls on it. Sprinkle more mozzarella cheese on top. I also added some garlic salt and basil. Bake for approximately 12 minutes, or until golden brown. Enjoy just plain or with some marinara sauce! (Based off a recipe found at http://www.honeybearlane.com/2012/10/easy-and-fast-pizza-rolls.html)

    180 South

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    March 20, 2014
    “180 South” is an adventure documentary that follows the journey of explorer Jeff Johnson on his quest to climb Corcovado, a mountain in Patagonia. Johnson follows a dream he first had after watching a film of Yvonne Chouinard and Doug Tompkins, the founders of Patagonia Clothing Company and North Face, respectively. Pioneers in rock climbing, Chouinard and Tompkins take a journey down south on an adventure to climb Mt. Fitzeroy, which turns into a life-altering journey. Johnson gathers up some of his most trusted friends, surfer mountaineers who all head towards Patagonia to meet up with Chouinard and Tompkins. Johnson joins the crew of a man sailing his boat from Seattle to his home in Chile. They encounter rough ocean conditions, Johnson finds himself adjusting to life at sea, and they even pick up some friends along the way. The movie gets a little bit preachy as it gets further into the adventure, but this is overcome by stunning visual images, and the incredible journey this group of ordinary people decide to embark on. Honestly, this movie would be worth watching just for the fantastic imagery of the natural environments. However, the story is fascinating, and has aspects that you would only expect to find in a real adventure movie, not a documentary. Overall, “180 South” has a good message, but if you are not really into that then it is still worth watching just for the imagery of Patagonia. I would highly recommend this to anyone who is a fan of documentaries, or a fan of climbing, surfing, or travel in general.