The Crescent

The Dating Game: Couples

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February 13, 2016
Last week saw the return of the annual Dating Game. Before the Game, I sat down to talk with the couples competing this year. Responses have been edited for space and clarity. Bobi Whitehead and Andrew Bergh – Dating Reporter: Tell me a little about yourselves. Bobi: We’re seniors. I am an interdisciplinary major studying Christian ministries and theater. Andrew: And I am a music education and vocal performance major, with a worship arts minor. Reporter: How long have you two been dating? Andrew: A little bit over a year. Reporter: How did you two meet? Andrew: So we met in choir our freshman year. We never really talked to each other. Bobi: We both tried for choir chaplain, and we both got male and female chaplain. Andrew: So we started spending a lot of time together, through that– Reporter: That’s such a George Fox story. Bobi: Praying for each other! Andrew: Everyone was asking, “are you two a thing?” and we’re like, “No, we’re not, we’re just good friends.” It turned out to be more than just friends. Bobi: Then we started dating and everyone still thought we were just good friends. Reporter: How did you start dating? Andrew: I made a video: “10 reasons you have no reason not to date me.” Bobi: It was hilarious. Andrew: My style, I’m flush with cash, my car… Bobi: And he got consent. Andrew: Yeah, I asked her dad, too. Reporter: How has your dating experience been impacted by the dating culture at George Fox? Bobi: When a guy and a girl hang out, I think people just assume they’re dating. Reporter: Have you been getting lots of comments about getting married? Andrew: Absolutely. Bobi: Ring by spring! Andrew: So, if we win the Dating Game tonight, I will propose on stage. Bobi: And if we lose, we’ll break up.   Bryan Neufeld and Keiko Fujii – Engaged Reporter: Tell me a little about yourselves. Keiko: We’re both seniors, I’m a computer science major. Bryan: I’m a computer engineer. Reporter: So when is the big day? Bryan: It’s the end of May. Reporter: So how long have you been dating? Keiko: A year and four months. Reporter: How did you meet? Keiko: We were in the same freshman dorm. We both lived in Pennington. Bryan: So we both interacted normally. We had the same group of friends, because we’re sciencey. Reporter: How did you start dating? Bryan: I had a creative method to (ask her out). We had played this game called Hack RUN, which is kind of simulating hacking into a system, and it’s really fun – you feel like a hacker, it’s great. And so I tried to replicate the game, only I made it custom, and at the end, it had a poem that you finally get to, and the poem was how I officially asked her out. It was a very pretty poem. Keiko: It was at the Oregon coast, too, when he finally gave it to me. Bryan: The Oregon coast is her favorite spot. Reporter: What has been your experience with the dating culture at George Fox? Keiko: Well, when I actually first came, I was in a long-distance relationship with a guy back home, so it was interesting getting to observe the dating culture without actually feeling the need to be in it. Definitely, there was almost like this pressure, at least among the girls, to have a significant other freshman year. Our RA at the time was single, and so we would always joke around about how we would set her up and find her a guy. Bryan: I think the biggest way George Fox culture impacted dating was that– I came from public schools, and finding a Christian girl in a public school was rather difficult in Denver. And so, it just became way easier to find someone actually compatible [at George Fox]. Keiko: And it’s nice, because people choose to be here, and so you’re all already have something in common.   Molly and Sean Roberston – Married Reporter: Tell me a little about yourselves. Sean: I’m a junior psych major. I’m nontraditional, so I’m 27 with kids. And a wife. Molly: I’m not a student. I’m a stay at home mom to our two boys, and I am really good at laundry, cooking, putting people down to naps. So I do a lot of that. Reporter: How long have you been married? Molly: It will be three years, in August. Sean: We should say five years to make it sound better. Molly: A hundred years. It’s a lot. Reporter: That’s impressive. Sean: It’s the evangelical dating culture. Molly: Anyway, three years. We dated for two years, and we were engaged nine months into our dating-ness. Reporter: How did you meet? Molly: We met in third grade. Sean: We’ve known each other for a very long time. I think my earliest memory of you was you beating me at wall ball. I think I called you a name, probably, and you chased me around the playground. Molly: You weren’t very nice. Sean: Well, you beat me at wall ball. Molly: We both went to the same junior high and high school, but then we both moved away. When we were 23, he was coming back into town from the Navy, and we hung out. It wasn’t supposed to be a date– Sean: No, just friends catching up. Molly: But then it turned into a date. And then he asked me “where was this going?” right after the date. Sean: You don’t need to say that. Molly: That totally happened. Reporter: What has been your experience in the evangelical dating culture? Sean: We weren’t coming from that perspective when we were dating. I grew up in the church, but I was away from the church while I was in the military. And then, as we started dating, it became part of our lives. And then, as we were getting married, it just blossomed– Molly: Blossomed– Sean and Molly: We finish each other’s … sandwiches. Sean: We made it a point, that as we were getting married, we were also getting married with God.  

Cambria Herrera directs The Balkan Women

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February 13, 2016
“It is a big honor to direct a main stage show when you’re a student,” said Cambria Herrera, a senior theatre major at George Fox University (GFU) This spring, Herrera is thrilled to be directing Jules Tosca’s “The Balkan Women” on GFU’s Woodmar Auditorium stage. While set design, costume design, and casting for the production have barely begun, the process truly started more than two years ago when Herrera first approached Rhett Luedtke, GFU’s theatre department head, and expressed interest in directing. Some GFU students may have already encountered Herrera’s projects, like Lee Blessing’s “Eleemosynary,” which she directed in her junior year, or David Auburn’s “Proof” at Valley Repertory Theatre. Herrera also won the regional award for top director for a scene from John Logan’s “Red” at the Kennedy Center American College Theatre Festival (KCACTF.) “The Balkan Women” is a drama centering on Muslim women in detention camp during the Bosnian War. “Over the summer, it was a really hard process to pick a play. I read over sixty plays,” Herrera says. In the end, she chose a script she felt would best speak to her audience and facilitate discussion about relevant issues, even though she knew a play with a dark and complex storyline would be challenging. Herrera sees the art of theatre as a conduit for enlightenment. “It was how much you can learn through theatre than really drew me to it, because I love learning,” she said. “The Balkan Women” has a message Herrera knows will challenge her audience; the work explores issues of racial conflict, war, rape, and gender, to name a few. Herrera’s experience as a woman with multi-cultural background impacts the way she approaches theatre storytelling. “Unfortunately, most mainstream plays are exclusively about white Americans, not about Americans from other cultures. I really want to direct shows by women of color; I want to empower other women, and I someday hope to write plays myself and have them produced, and that way there are more Latina voices out there,” she said. Herrera hopes the audience at GFU will be receptive to the darker, more challenging quality of “The Balkan Women.” Herrera said, “I don’t want people to be scared of seeing a play with issues.” Hererra’s relationship with theatre has been developing since she was six years old. As a child, she started out in musical theatre to make friends, but became passionate about the art when she got to college. “The power that it has is something I learned later. I recognized the power it had on people that were doing it, but later I realized the power it could have on audiences and culture,” she said. “The Balkan Women” will run April 8-17

Residence Hall Recipes

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Needed ingredients: egg, ramen, and seasoning. Simple as that.
December 7, 2015
Let’s face it: cooking in residence halls is almost impossible. And for me, cooking in general is pretty impossible. So when faced with the task of feeding myself in college, the prospects were pretty bleak. And I’m a student who doesn’t even like to cook. I feel bad for students who love to cook, but don’t have a place to do so successfully. Because let’s be honest, the community fridge is sort of a free for all (although I admit to nothing). Also, where are you supposed to store cooking utensils? Storage space is limited as it is. Perhaps you could leave your cooking supplies in the floor’s kitchen, but there are definite trust issues there. I wouldn’t necessarily want my pot to become the community pot; that would be plain unsanitary. I’m assuming. Or maybe I’m just selfish with my saucepans. With all of this in mind, I have scoured the internet, researched for hours and hours, just in order to bring to you the best recipes that would be easy to make in a dorm room, recipes I will be sharing and detailing my own possibly-disastrous experiences with. It’s going to be a lot of fun. So, first on the list (drum roll please…): Top Ramen! No, but actually. This recipe is what I will call ‘upscale’ ramen— special ramen made all within the comforts of your own residence hall. This recipe is ridiculously easy, not even I could mess it up this time around. Needed ingredients: Ramen (duh) One egg (or two if you like eggs) Spice of your choice (I chose a nice Creole seasoning, on sale at the local Fred Meyer) The first problem I encountered while making this meal was what to cook it in. At first I thought I was going to resort to the microwave, but luckily there was a clean pot in the kitchen unattended on the stove (see, this is why I would have trust issues). Once you have a pot, it should be relatively smooth sailing. Step one: boil water. How much water you may ask? Good question. I just eyeballed it, the package says two cups but nobody left any measuring cups in the kitchen for me to use. Step two: put the block of ramen into the pot. Or crush it up first, whatever works best for your ramen needs. Step three: beat your egg in a cup, and then remove ramen from stove top when done. Then, (this is the really fun part) pour the egg slowly into the ramen as you stir. This was my first time making ramen with egg in it, and watching the egg cook itself just about blew my mind. Step four: pour ramen into a bowl, then add spice to taste (I recommend Creole but that’s just me). Step five: enjoy! If I’m going to be honest here, I was not expecting this recipe to go well. I thought it was going to be kind of disgusting, but I was ready to try residence hall cooking and see how it worked out. Overall, I was pretty satisfied with the end result. It was a solid 7.8/10, would make again, if only to use more of the large container of Creole seasoning I bought. The final product. Look at that steaming bowl of mediocrity. Needed ingredients: egg, ramen, and seasoning. Simple as that.

Oregon's Slice of Middle Earth

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Sunset at Government Cove
November 29, 2015
The Columbia River Gorge is known for being a giant evergreen playground for hikers, and for scarcely being able to look any direction without seeing a majestic waterfall right in front of your face. It’s also known for being the birthplace of windsurfing which, if you happen to go out there without checking the weather first, will become apparent as soon as you step outside and start chasing your hat: the wind is pretty extraordinary! But what a lot of people don’t realize is that just past Cascade Locks, Middle Earth makes a small appearance. When heading east on I-84, take exit 44 into Cascade Locks and take a right towards downtown. After continuing on Frontage Rd. and taking a left on Wyeth Rd. you will soon come to a stop where the road ends at a gate. This place is called Government Cove. There are several paths that go up and around the short cliffs that make up the small peninsula. The rock formations are unlike anything else that can be seen in the area. The short, moss-like grass covering the tops of the cliffs and the small fields on the ground appear to be imported straight from New Zealand or Scotland. At times, it seems as if all that’s missing is Aragorn, Legolas, and Gimli riding up to Rohan, or warg riders charging at men on horses. All of this lies right in the middle of the Columbia River Gorge, with dramatic mountains that be seen on either side, just so you don’t forget completely that you are still in the Pacific Northwest. In addition to the cliffs there are to explore, there is a jetty that extends out from here, allowing you to get an amazing view of the cove with the mountains in the background. It also give you an opportunity to experience the Gorge from the middle of the river, without having to take a ride on a boat. A great way to cap off the day here is to build a fire in one of the many fire pits dispersed throughout the peninsula. This spot proves to be a great place to get a solid dose of exploration, without being tired after a hike or running into crowds taking selfies. Or running into orcs for that matter, most likely.

Truth in Faces

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November 20, 2015
When art major Nicole Williford makes a portrait, she doesn’t just paint a face. She’s not interested in the split-second capture of two eyes, a nose, and a mouth. Instead, she crafts oil and pigment into the essence of a person’s soul. Her work was recently on display in Brougher Hall, where viewers could see her exploration of movement and truth in her subjects’ profiles. Portrait painters usually work to accurately render one perspective of a human face, but Williford was unsatisfied with this traditional method. Her images, at first glance, are a little odd. The eyes of the person are not where they should be, or are not there at all. Faces come out from faces, eyebrows overlap noses, and the overall effect looks like a badly timed photograph with a slow shutter speed. “We live in a world of visual manipulation and filtration,” she explained in her artist statement. “A large portion of my exploration of portraiture has been an intense pursuit of honesty.” Williford believes most of our online portrayals of ourselves are not accurate. With a myriad of editing options, filters, and the convenient “untag” button, it has become easy to lie about ourselves. To Williford, a bad photo—where a person is caught in motion—might be more telling about him or her than an edited online image. “Oftentimes, [that kind of photo] is more real,” she said. Painting a true image of someone’s essence is not easy, as she’s found. Williford began this portrait project with a painting of her friend Grandpa Roy (Heibert), but realized her large-scale image was not an accurate depiction of his character. “Grandpa Roy is such a gentle man, and it’s such an aggressive size,” she said about the painting. “I want to be honorable to who the person is.” Williford often uses more than one artistic method to get closer to an accurate representation of the person. With Grandpa Roy, she first made a series of photographs, then sculpted a bust to work from before beginning to paint. “I can feel his face, without actually holding his face,” she said with a laugh. “I’m making the actual object, then going back and painting the illusion of that exploration.” Williford enjoys the kinesthetic experience of sculpting first, and she believes it helps her render the subject more accurately. She finds sculpture very fulfilling and even considers it a spiritual practice. “There’s this deep sense of ‘I am doing the right thing,’” she said, “and that this is where I’m supposed to be.” With her portrait series, Williford hopes viewers see that her images are uncomfortable and even a little troubling, but also true. Her paintings may take some time for viewers to understand, and she’s okay with that. “I hope they cause enough tension … for people to really look at something,” she said. “We are so complex, and there are so many different parts of who we are, even in one moment.”  

Culture Corner

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November 20, 2015
By Kosette Isakson, Crescent Staff As president of the International Club at George Fox University (GFU), Jack Tan knows the importance of exploring cultural differences: an exploration that will take place with ASC’s new event, Culture Corner. Culture Corner is a revival of a previous event called English Corner. Both international students and domestic students are invited to attend Culture Corner to take part in games and discussions and learn about other cultures. “Just sharing the story with each other can fill the gap between them,” said Tan. “So that’s why I wanted to be president of International Club this year, to try and achieve and emphasize that voice on the campus.” Tan saw the struggles of the international students as an orientation assistant this fall. Having been new to this country six years ago, Tan could put himself in their shoes. Tan’s family moved here from Guangdong, China, before his freshman year of high school. “It’s totally different than America,” he said, remembering his first terrifying days at Beavercreek High School in Ohio. Reflecting on new international students, Tan said, “They’re scared, because they’re by themselves. And they’re here because they want a better life, better job, better opportunity in the future. I know how they feel. So I think having this Culture Corner back can really help them.” During his first semester at GFU, Tan attended English Corner and saw firsthand the power of having conversations about culture with other students, both domestic and international. At the beginning of this semester, Tan was one of the multicultural representatives for ASC. The Vice President of Multicultural Life, Noelle Ho, says the purpose of this new ASC subcommittee is “to represent our multicultural students; cultivate awareness, respect, and appreciation of cultural diversity; and provide students of diverse races and cultures [with] a supportive environment.” There are three multicultural representatives currently working under Ho, but Tan has since given up his position on ASC to focus on academics and the International Club. Tan and Ho confirmed that the ownership of Culture Corner will transition from ASC to the International Club starting next semester, in hopes of increasing international students’ attendance. Culture Corner happens every other Thursday from 7-8 p.m. The first week’s theme was “Get To Know You” and the second theme was “Appreciation,” in honor of Thanksgiving. Students discussed the ways in which they show appreciation to their friends: ways that Tan says are very different in China. Tan hopes to increase attendance so that “eventually this event can be a symbolic event on the campus.” Tan’s desire to help connect cultures extends outside GFU as well. He is a junior finance major and has been working for a nonprofit in Portland called IRCO (Immigrant and Refugee Community Organization). “I want my life to be meaningful to people by serving others,” Tan said.

Journey to the Wolf Creek Bridge

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The Wolf Creek Bridge
November 13, 2015
The typical reaction for those seeking a get-away from Newberg is to either head east to Mt. Hood and the Gorge, or to beeline it west for the beach. While there is nothing wrong with either of those, adventure awaits for those who think to make a stop before hitting the coast. The Salmonberry River hike runs along an abandoned railroad near the Tillamook State Forest. Split into two sections, the Upper Salmonberry River, and the Lower Salmonberry River, the tracks lie nestled deep into the woods since they were last used in 2007. Admittedly, it’s quite a bit more complicated getting there than stopping before Cannon Beach. The directions that take you down some very remote and unpaved roads can be found here. This takes you to the start of the Upper Salmonberry River, at the Cochran trailhead where two massive trestles can be found. This trail follows the tracks for five miles in, initially running beside them for a less than mile before the path takes you directly on the tracks. The trail runs through some small foliage that has been carved out to make space for walking, although some parts are more overgrown than others. Other parts clear out to stretches of thick forest that were cleared out to make space for the train to come through. On the way you will also pass through a couple tunnels that are just long enough to require bringing some sort of light source with you. After about two and a half miles you will reach the Big Baldwin Bridge, a massive trestle that spans over 500 feet and rises over 160 feet off the ground. This spot is not for anyone afraid of heights. The walkway is very solid, but looking down through the see-through metal grates will make any acrophobe forget this quickly. The top of this bridge offers some views over the top of the expansive forest as well. If you happen to bring a harness and some carabiners with you, there is a cable and a board that allows you to walk underneath the tracks on the inside of the bridge. Another mile past this will take you to the Wolf Creek Bridge, another all wood trestle that curves off into the woods ahead of you. While not as tall as the Big Baldwin, this impressive bridge stands over 100 feet above the wolf creek. Further hiking along the tracks takes you down to the Salmonberry River, but the dramatic views at the Wolf Creek Bridge make for a fitting end to this adventure without having to go through the full 10 miles in and out.

School Style: Letterman Jackets

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November 13, 2015
  Ah, the nostalgia of a letterman’s jacket. This classic wardrobe staple, a man’s jacket with elasticized sleeves, a boxy shape, and a snap closures, has been around since as early as the 19th century, when Harvard University brought them into vogue for their baseball team. The bright school colors, raised emblems and football numbers of this garment, sometimes also called a varsity jacket, bring to mind crisp fall afternoons spent at football rallies eating cracker jacks and caramel apples. In former days, a player would often lend his letterman’s jacket to his girlfriend, who would wear it proudly to show others that she was “taken.” Today, lovers of vintage fashion can enjoy experimenting with the letterman’s jacket. Below I list a few ideas to try; but don’t limit yourself to just one or two looks, because the possibilities are endless!   Go classic Wear your letterman’s jacket like a gal in the forties would have: paired with a pleated skirt, a crisp blouse, and penny-loafers or brogues. To be even more authentic, try curling your hair and tying it back with a ribbon. Add red lipstick to turn up the forties effect!   Go edgy Take a cue from artists and celebrities like Gabriel Aplin and Gigi Hadid, who combine the vintage kitchiness of the letterman jacket with modern edge. In her music video “Home,” Aplin wears ripped jeans, a graphic tee, sheer socks, and block-heel sandals. Her hair is cut in choppy bangs and is styled to look mussed and undone. Hadid pairs her distressed, dark-toned jacket with jeans and black ankle booties, along with a sweater slung casually around her hips. Her hair is sleekly parted down the middle and her makeup is modern and simplistic. For this look, the jacket is clearly the focal point to an otherwise streamlined outfit. Go fancy Nothing is so unexpectedly elegant as the pairing of a fancy dress with a menswear coat. So if you’re feeling especially daring this Friday night, add a little masculine to your feminine by throwing a varsity jacket over your going-out ensemble. For maximum effect, wear a bodycon-fit dress and keep your shoes and accessories simple; this will help to balance the bulkiness of the jacket. Every era leaves future generations with defining cultural expressions in the form of clothing. The letterman jacket is one of those classic garments that keeps us both warm and stylish more than one hundred years after its invention. Have fun experimenting with this iconic fashion staple!

Nathaniel Burmeister: Mad DJ at Everything

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November 10, 2015
  Last Saturday night, George Fox University hosted a talent show where several people were allowed to put their talents in the limelight and bask in the applause. Among those talents (and carrying an impressive amount of praise) was Nathaniel Burmeister. Burmeister beat boxed to the tune his choir team sang and the audience was changed and impressed. He is a Cinema and Media Communications major with a minor in Computer Science and a member of the William Penn Honors Program. If that doesn’t sound like a plate full, he also juggles photography, singing, choir, and RA Life. “Ranked from third to first I would love an internship in Portland, Seattle,” said Burmeister, “and my first choice would be going with the CTO program over to Nashville and spending a summer over there working either in the studios or doing a partnership with Belmont University.” Several people will agree that Burmeister’s natural excitement and passion for life rubs off on the people around him. His drive and hard earned talent gives him energy unique only to him. “My mom and dad,” said Burmeister, “definitely put a lot of emphasis on, ‘You try a whole bunch of things,’ and did not put any emphasis on, ‘if you fail then it’s just not meant to be.’ Persistence is one of the biggest things they emphasized.” During the quiet hours Burmeister finds himself turning to his stress relievers. Burmeister calls himself an extraverted-introvert and turns to singing, reading, or watching TV to recharge. “My favorite book for a while has been The Great Divorce by C.S. Lewis,” said Burmeister. “There have been very few books that I’ve read and have kept me up in the very early morning hours reading. That’s one of them.” Burmeister finds a way to inspire the people around him either with the talent he show’s in his music or the passion he puts into his studies.

School Style: '90s Grunge

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November 10, 2015
A young woman walks across her college campus wearing a short black dress with torn, knee-high black stockings and clunky Doc Martens. A few years ago, she might have been the recipient of some judgmental stares. But in 2015, ’90s grunge is a real thing, and her fashion sense is right on the money. What is ’90s grunge, anyway? Acid wash blue jeans and chokers come to mind, as do short, choppy haircuts and plaid shirts slung lazily around hips. Think back to movies like Clueless, and shows like My So Called Life; the decade of the ’90s had a distinct look that was both carelessly simple and purposefully frumpy. The 2015 take on ’90s grunge thrives on minimalism, so when you’re shopping online (or in your parents’ basement), look for shades of black and white. A white tee with rolled sleeves tucked into a pair of slightly baggy high-rise jeans is a perfect place to start. If I could choose a word to describe 90’s grunge, it would be “substantial.” Nothing about it is frilly or ethereal; the fabrics of grunge are hefty denim, wool, and stiff cotton. This look has to come across as carefree: you got up this morning, grabbed a mug of black coffee, and threw on your clothes before hurrying off to band practice. This style is not for the faint of heart, but it is blessedly easy, and the sturdy fabrics and full coverage silhouettes are perfect for the colder months. The look goes from frumpy to luxe when silhouettes like boxy turtleneck sweaters are recreated in quilted cotton, in various shades of soft pink, mustard, and baby blue. Even baggy overalls get a fresh interpretation with gold hardware and cuffed hems. If you’re needing inspiration for your own foray into ’90s grunge, check out sites like NastyGal, Asos, and Sabo Skirt. ’90s grunge might be a style none of us thought would come back. But back it is, with brushed-cotton vengeance; I’m sure Claire Danes would be proud.

George Fox Film Society Has High Hopes

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November 7, 2015
Austin Coates, president of the George Fox Film Society (GFFS), is a transfer student from San Jose State University. As a student of animation and illustration, he found the lines quickly blurred between class and extracurricular club in his experience there. Looking back, he sees the relationship between large clubs (nearly 600 students) and lackadaisical faculty as a dysfunctional, even harmful, product of club dynamics. He brings a sense of democracy and relational growth to the GFFS. The club meets every Tuesday at 8 p.m. in EHS 102. While some may easily dismiss , Coates sees it as somewhat more spectacular, more glass half-full. He insists that this is not just a CMCO club; accounting, theater, computer science majors, and more have all attended to share in cinematic art and life perspectives. Coates leads the group with Christ at the center of his heart. It is one of his three main pillars for the club. His other visions are increasing the value of visual literacy – the individual interpretation of art or images – among students pursuing art or any other skill, and to keep the discussion of cinema’s core going on: the thinking, the talking, and the experiencing of life. As a brand new club, getting established has been more of a tightrope walk than a cakewalk. The group, open to any and all, hopes for more students to engage in the meaningful conversations the club hosts. At the end of the day, Coates just wants people to know about his passions. He believes in the joy of discussion groups, and he wants to see the GFFS shine from here on out.