Feature

  • Looking Up: Thoughts from Oxford University

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    Upper Rad Cam Photo
    October 16, 2014
    I’ve started looking at the ceiling. Most afternoons, I sit in the upper levels of the Radcliffe Camera, one of Oxford’s 100+ library buildings. I sit at a wooden desk, fitted with its own light and electrical outlet. I read. Or try to. It is silent here, mostly. The echo here amplifies every noise, making nearly every action that is not reading—someone sliding their chair back, coughing, or (the horror) dropping a book—into an Event that draws eyes towards the perpetrator. “You WILL sit and you WILL read,” these walls say. I reread the paragraph I thought I read. But after three hours of sitting at this desk, these are no longer English words, but little black hieroglyphics, taunting me with their impossibility. I don’t know what I’m reading now. What’s my research topic? Does this book even have anything to do with it? Why am I here? I lean back in the chair (also wooden, probably here when the library opened in 1749), close my eyes. And then I open them and see the ceiling. Wow, I think (any powers of eloquence have sizzled to a crisp by now). I get to study here. I don’t HAVE to. I GET to. I take a deep breath and look back at my page, and discover I can somehow read hieroglyphics.

    A Sip of Fall

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    fall-drinks (1)
    October 16, 2014
    Oregon has seemed to think that it’s August for far too long. But fall is officially here and so are the fall inspired drinks! Normally it is easy to tell by the nip in the air and the changing of the leaves that fall is upon us; however this year, Mother Nature seems to have had a short in her circuits. Only recently has the weather begun to change, calling for warmer clothes and toasty fall drinks. One of the things that I love about GFU is its close proximity to several wonderful and distinctly different coffee shops. Everyone has a favorite place to sip warm java and meet up with friends and study groups, so why not review some of the featured fall drinks from each location? Coffee Cat has always been a favorite of mine, so I was very excited to try their Pumpkin Pie Latte. When I took my first sip, I was reminded of eating a slice of pumpkin pie and then drinking a cup of coffee to wash it down. I really enjoyed the drink; the flavors of pumpkin and coffee were very distinct to me. It reminded me of the smell that wafts up from carving a pumpkin during Halloween. The latte came topped with cinnamon, which added to the flavor to the drink as well. Coffee Cottage’s Apple-Cranberry Spiced Cider with caramel whipped cream was like taking a warm bite of delicious apple pie. The cranberry flavor gave the drink a little bit of a crisp and tart twinge that I really enjoyed. My favorite part was the caramel whipped cream; it paired with the drink deliciously. Think crunchy fall walks through orange, yellow and red leaves, scarves and sweaters, and staying inside wrapped in a cozy blanket. That is what I thought of when sipping this delicious toasty beverage. I highly recommend giving it a try. The Spiced Apple Scone also from Coffee Cottage was in the one day old sale, but still sweet and a sensation for the taste buds. It was a bit crispy on the outside and had real chunks of cooked apple in the center. It reminded me of eating apple pie crust, which is my favorite part of the pie. The center was moist and had the texture of sweet corn bread with pockets of apple. An overall win. As far as chai goes, Chapter’s Pumpkin Pie Chai was good, but it wasn’t my favorite fall drink of the bunch, because I couldn’t taste distinct pumpkin. It also had a hint of graham cracker taste, which might have been an attempt at pie crust flavor. Overall, for a chai it was well-prepared, warm and comforting. After going around to many of the local coffee shops and trying their different fall specials, I am fully ready for the change of season. Summer is over and fall is officially here.  

    Adventure Bound

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    October 15, 2014
    “Let’s go on an adventure,” I’ll say to one of my friends, usually while we are sitting on a couch avoiding homework. “What kind of adventure?” they usually ask. “Anything,” I respond, because in my mind adventure is not just going on a hike or on a road trip. To me, adventure can be as small as visiting friends, getting something to eat late at night, or playing a game with friends. Adventure does not have to be taking back the home of a king under a mountain. Adventure can be getting out of the normal routine. My name is Britta Walen. I am a sophomore, an English major, and a reporter for the Crescent. I enjoy reading, listening to melancholy music, eating peanut butter out of the jar, and people-watching on my porch. My goal in writing this is to share my experiences in the hope that you will share yours. I want to show my fellow GFU students what they can do here in Newberg when they don’t want to go too far or when they can’t leave campus or spend too much money. I want other people to realize that adventures do not always have to be a big extravaganza. Sometimes adventures are the little things that we do not even notice. I believe that God gives us little adventures all the time, we just have to be excited about what he is going to show us.   So starting next week, we will be adventure bound, you and me together. Because adventure awaits.

    The Passion and Talent of Faith

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    October 14, 2014
    Despite having the talent, she lacked the passion needed to thrive here. She wouldn’t last much longer at this news station. After graduating from George Fox University, Faith Curammeng returned to her home in Anchorage, Ala. It wasn’t too long before the CBS affiliate asked her to be the 5 p.m. TV news producer. She applied to be a writer, but accepted the offer. The show aired between Oprah and Dan Rather—a small-scale newscast sandwiched by national broadcasts. Because of the smaller nature of her show, Faith was able to do a lot of writing, as well as producing. “It was fun working with people I’d grown up watching on TV. There was power in being able to put something on TV,” she said. However, the honeymoon phase came to an end as she recognized the darker side of the career. “It was hard to have a career dependent on bad things happening,” she said. “It became hard not to feel good about having bad news. The worse the news, the better the story. It was an awful feeling.” Conflicting emotions continued to build as she experienced difficulties with the director of the news show. She didn’t like the director’s style and they soon butted heads. Luckily for Faith, she found a mentor in the executive producer, Tricia Moen. Like Faith, Tricia was a Christian. Faith had been feeling burned out on religion at the time, and Tricia was able to encourage her in ways other coworkers could not. The two women bonded over the difficulty of staying strong in their faith despite working in a toxic environment. Eventually, the studio needed to revamp its managerial positions and they let Tricia go. Without her mentor, Faith continued to struggle at the station, especially with the director. Her coworkers began telling her what she knew in her heart: “You’re good at what you do, but it’s not your passion.” “It was overwhelming to be a young professional,” Faith said. “When I quit, it ended as amicably as possible. I knew, and the director knew, that I was done.” Sometime later, she was offered a job there again. She turned it down. Now Faith is an adjunct instructor in the Department of Communication, Journalism and Cinematic Arts at GFU, her alma mater. She currently teaches Intro to Communication, Professional Writing and Broadcast News. In her Broadcast News class, Faith’s dry humor and informal approach stands out from other professors who have taught the course. She teaches from the front of the class while eating a vegan dinner from a Tupperware container and discussing her real world experience. She shares fond memories of her news jobs followed by jaded commentary. To many students, Faith is the perfect instructor: She has lived out this career path. She knows firsthand what broadcast news is like. After her time at the CBS affiliate, Faith was asked to work at another station as the TV commercial producer. “I was able to be so much more creative,” Faith said. “I could write, film, and edit the commercial concepts and scripts. There was more freedom in expression. I loved that.” Despite enjoying that job, she quit in order to move back to Oregon for new educational opportunities. Her first job while back in the pacific northwest was as a media assistant in a Sherwood junior high. It was simpler than the frantic lifestyle of broadcast news. She spent the year checking out books to students and monitoring the computer labs. When asked about that job, Faith smiled. “I loved being an authority figure but not a teacher. I could give ear to their issues. They’re raw and getting to know who they are,” she said. Faith had always aspired to be teaching in some way, whether formally or informally. She loved working with youth and young adults. The job in Sherwood allowed her to live out her passion in a smaller capacity. However, she needed a stable job that would allow her to continue enjoying the pacific northwest lifestyle. “I’m a West Coast girl. I enjoy the outdoors, so any area that allows me ocean and mountain access is perfect for me,” she explained. She knew she was good at working for the news industry and found herself applying to work at KATU as a writer. Soon enough, they were asking her to be an editor. Hoping she could take the job and move into a writing position, she accepted the offer. For six years, Faith stayed on the same shift as an editor. “They always had someone else in mind for the writing job. Although it would challenge my mind more than editing, I would be working more but getting paid less. I decided to stay put,” she said. The early morning shifts, four days a week, accommodated her outdoorsy nature. “I could take lots of trips to Canada and Seattle and go hiking or biking,” she said. “I trained for a marathon. I could go back home once or twice a year.” After six long years, GFU reached out to Faith, asking her to work for them. Clella Jaffe, a retired professor, had been friends with Faith on Facebook and they remained in contact with each other since Faith graduated in 2001. Faith had taught at Portland Community College once before and had help from Clella. When Clella asked if Faith was interested in teaching at GFU, she responded with great enthusiasm. This would be a great chance to continue living out her dream of teaching. When she speaks to her Broadcast News students, she is brutally honest. She shares her experiences and describes the places she worked as “toxic environments.” While some students are encouraged by her honesty, others wonder why Faith teaches a subject she is disillusioned by. Does she feel conflict in teaching a profession she feels jaded by? Faith said, “I try to push that aside since everyone’s experience will be different. The job is so fluid and dynamic. It is based on different markets and stations.” “I was to present it as, ‘Here are the tools you need,’” she explained. “If students are serious about being involved in broadcast news, I want to be honest with them. But, at the same time, tell them, ‘Dare to dream! It’s not utopia, but go for it!’” Discouraging students is the last thing she wants to do. When students show a lack of interest or hesitance to experiment within the Broadcast News class, she challenges them. “When else are you going to get the chance to play around with this stuff? Try it out! Play the role of news anchor! Be the director in this mock newscast!” When she was an undergraduate, earned a double degree in Communication Arts and Media Broadcasting. “I trust that God has opened doors for me before, so I keep my eyes open for new opportunities,” she said. For Faith, it’s all about encouraging students to find out what their passions are, what they’re good at, and how those overlap. As she discovered, it is often difficult to find that sweet spot. She was—and is—good at broadcast news. Her long-lasting passion and desire is to teach. At GFU, at least for now, it appears that Faith has found that space of overlap.

    Engineering a Bright Future

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    Michael_Photo
    October 13, 2014
    It’s a busy Monday morning in George Fox University’s student union building. The scene is typical: a flurry of study groups, professors walking about, and students slurping coffee and shuffling paper. In the midst of all this, one young man–an engineering major–walks in and sits down at a table. Nothing would give away the fact that he is currently being recruited by Fortune 500 companies. And he’s only a sophomore. Michael Peterson was scrolling through the university’s email announcements one day and saw an internship listed for Autodesk, a worldwide engineering and media software company with a campus in Lake Oswego, Ore. Interest piqued, he went to the career center to learn more. “Michael walked into my office, we chatted about his interests and background and I knew he would be a good fit,” said Deb Mumm-Hill, George Fox’s director of student success. He soon found himself working among high-level engineers on projects like 3D printing, drone development, and workflows for a product design suite. “I was working on interoperability,” says Peterson, “how the products work with each other, moving data between programs, moving 2D to 3D, stuff like that.” Autodesk’s software is used by car companies for modeling and simulations and by movie producers for high-quality graphics. They are also one of the leading developers in 3-D printing — a process that allows production companies to construct anything with internal cavities that are difficult to build out of metal, including rocket engines. “It’s really specialty stuff,” he says with a smile. His summer internship was also a specialty program. Peterson was part of a team of twelve other paid interns, all working alongside professional engineers. The program offered a living stipend and intern fieldtrips, including activities like paintballing and river floating. However, the internship was not all fun and games. He remembers the first few weeks being very intimidating. “It was kind of nerve-racking,” he says. “I had never worked in a corporate environment like that.” Even being the ambitious young man he is, Peterson found it hard to catch on at first. “It was really interesting to be an official intern—you have your own cubicle, have an IT guy, all these things that [mean] you fit into this company’s structure. It took me a week or so to figure that out, because there’s so many internal things that they do—internal communication, internal servers for information—all these different things that you have to get to know.” Although working at such a large corporation was a little overwhelming, he soon learned that being an intern didn’t mean he was unimportant. Whenever he had a question, someone always jumped in to make sure he got the answer. “I remember this one time I had a question, and my boss goes, ‘Well, let’s just have a conference call with the guy who made it.’ It’s like—wow—I don’t know if it’s that intense of a question.” Autodesk will use Peterson’s work this year in their annual nation-wide training conference. He and other interns produced a number of videos during the internship that detail how to use the company’s software. Thanks to the internship, the sophomore now has a number of opportunities to choose from for next summer. He is currently being recruited by Oshkosh Corporation, a company that designs and manufactures military grade trucks and tactical vehicles. “That would be cool,” he says about the recruitment offer, but he’s still keeping his options open. “I really have two companies that I’m looking at right now where I’d like to intern.” These two companies are well within reach for the Autodesk intern. One, called SpaceX, develops space flights for NASA. Although Peterson is only in his second year of college, he has high aspirations. Once he declares a concentration in mechanical engineering, he dreams of going into aerospace technology. The ultimate direction could change, but it’s something he is passionate about now. “I say aerospace because it’s an exciting field,” he says. Whatever he does decide to pursue next summer, it will certainly not fail to be exciting.            

    A Review of CBS's "Scorpion"

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    tvsequences-scorpion
    October 10, 2014
    With the beginning of autumn comes the releasing of the fall television schedule, much to the anticipation of most college students. Not only is this the chance to be relieved from cliff-hanging season finales of favorite shows, but it presents the opportunity to check out new shows as well. Last week. CBS introduced a new show called “Scorpion” to its Monday night lineup. The pilot aired Sept. 22 right after “The Big Bang Theory” at 8/9 central. CBS normally reserves this time slot for sitcoms, but they are trying something new by placing an action drama in the nine o’clock time slot. Ratings and time will eventually tell if the show will be renewed for a second season, but I can say for certain that Scorpion has made my list of shows to watch even though I should be studying/doing homework/sleeping. Loosely based on the real life of computer prodigy Walter O’Brien, this show is about a group of geniuses who are asked to help the United States Government solve problems that only people with high mental abilities could solve. If Scorpion were to have parents, the BBC’s television show “Sherlock” and “The Big Bang Theory” would likely win the DNA test. Walter O’Brien (Elyes Gabel) is one of the top five smartest people in the world. He has an IQ of 197 (to put that in perspective, Einstein had an IQ of 160) and is the leader of the Scorpion team. The Scorpion team includes mechanical prodigy Happy Quinn (Jadyn Wong), world-class shrink Toby Curtis (Eddie Kaye Thomas) and human calculator Sylvester Dodd (Ari Stidham). They are joined by Paige Dineen (Katharine McPhee), a single mom and former waitress who helps the characters connect to the human world and emotional side of things. The pilot episode opens explosively and keeps the viewer sucked in until the end. Walter O’Brien, who was able to hack into NASA to get the blueprints for a space shuttle to hang on his wall at the age of 11, is the leader of Scorpion. The team is asked by Federal Agent of Homeland Security, Cabe Gallo (Robert Patrick), to help stop a national security threat. At the end of the episode they are all offered full-time jobs working for the government as the last line of defense against high tech threats around the world. The show does a good job of being believable. One difficult aspect was that some of the secondary characters are hard to relate to, because they are so smart and lack basic human emotional skills. It’s hard to tell if that is simply because they aren’t played by the best actors, or because their characters are supposed to come across as a little wooden and lacking social skills. That is why the show needs Paige Dineen, the humanizing character. Ever since being the runner-up on American Idol in 2006, Katharine McPhee has not only worked on her musical career but her acting career as well. McPhee shines in this new series; her acting is real and raw. She brings comedy as well as a human aspect to the show; she is not afraid to call the geniuses out on their lack of empathy and sensitivity (something that happens a lot). Overall, this show is worth the watch. But be careful: it is a show that sucks you in. I am already addicted after just one episode. You can view the pilot episode here: Scorpion Pilot

    Fall Fashion Coming to Life by Melissa Harris

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    Sam Hebard - GFU Junior
    October 10, 2014
    The weather is changing, as you may have noticed. The leaves are turning different colors, and even though the sun is still out, we are now seeing the ushering in of a new season. Yes, it’s time for fall. So pack away your rainbow flip flops, shorts, and  leather sandals with love and say good bye to them until next year. But cheer up! There are some things we have to look forward to, and as you can see by these pictures, the students of George Fox University have already started to pack away summer looks and are definitely paying attention to what is trending for this new season. We can see that boots are always going to come back for the new season and this year there are so many different options. There are knee high boots to wear with skinny jeans; ankle cut boots worn with loose fitting denim; and we are seeing that the folded down leather boots with laces have made their way back as well. If you are tired of always wearing your boots with denim, or pants in general, don’t be afraid to pair your boots with a fantastic mini skirt or the “go to” just above the knee casual cotton dress. These looks can be pulled off with knee high boots, or ankle high boots with tights and socks. Don’t be afraid to pair your look with a faux leather jacket or even a great blazer. Brightly colored pieces are always in, but try to stay away from mixing patterns. We saw this last season and there is a reason why it didn’t last long. This week’s top tip: Don’t be afraid to use colored eye shadow. Stray away from the neutral norm, and add a little color to your bottom lid. Try using eye shadow as your liner, instead of liquid or pencil liner. It’s cheaper, cleaner, and more defining. Remember that your eyes can also be your best accessory without looking like your mom in her 80’s high school prom photo. Britta Walen- GFU Sophomore

    Faith Moves Mountains

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    Faith Kamau
    October 6, 2014
    “Business” isn’t quite the right word for it. It’s more like a project—a charity project that has deep significance for Faith Kamau, a freshman at George Fox University (GFU). On certain days, students can see Faith in the Student Union Building selling traditional African fabrics. It would be easy for them to only know that much about her. What they might not realize is to what extent the project, titled “Faith Moves Mountains,” is rooted in her love for her homeland and family. Faith was born and raised in Kenya with her two younger brothers. Her family lived outside the slums, but close enough for her to have a deep understanding of what life in the slums is like for others. Her parents, both Kenyans, are missionaries in their own country. They work with the organization Christian Missionaries Fellowship and are supported by Newberg Christian Church. Faith lights up when she talks about her mom and dad. It doesn’t take a lot of words for her to convey the love she has for them: “They inspire me. They’re amazing.” Her mom is from a poor background, although not the slums. She decided to start a school with 50 kids, which has grown into an education program with 11,000 students. Faith’s dad quit his job as a manager at an insurance company so he could help his wife. Faith said, “They’re all about faith.” Despite being raised in a strong Christian family, it was last year when she decided to really take her faith personally. “God has delivered me from bad situations that have grown my faith. God is the One with all the might and power, not me,” Faith said. For a time, she was a Sunday school teacher, and her time of ministry encouraged Faith in her ambitions. She hopes to graduate with a degree in Psychology, and is considering adding a minor in social work. After studying in Oregon, she plans on returning to Kenya, “to work with kids or anyone who has faced trauma. I’m interested in mission work with kids in the slums.” While in school, Faith contributes to her parents’ ministry. It’s her way of staying connected to both her family and a mission. Profits from Faith Moves Mountains go towards helping students go to university through her parents’ education program. The charity project began when people in Kenya showed interest in her clothes. The idea was that it could be a for-profit business, but Faith shifted towards giving the money to charity. When she came to GFU, she thought there could be a potential interest in traditional African fabrics. She was right. For now, she’s hoping to keep the project going as long as possible. There’s no real goal—she just wants to see how much she can raise for her parents. The fabrics she sells connect her to her home. However, sometimes the project is a distraction as well. “Even though I get to talk to my family often, sometimes [the project] distracts me,” she explained. “Conversations get focused on fabrics and shipments and the money.” Still, she is happy to be doing something meaningful. By selling traditional fabrics, she is constantly reminded of the people in Kenya. Faith describes Kenya as having a distinct separation of the rich and the poor. “It is much easier to see the poverty than the hope,” she said. Her heart for the poor is evident. “I see so much talent in the people there,” Faith said. “The devil is trying to wrestle with them. They’re great people but in a desperate situation. When they can get out of that, they can do great things.” As Faith discusses her experiences and desires, her humility is overwhelming. “I am honored to share with you. I didn’t think I was interesting,” she said. Indeed, Faith is an inspiring young adult, whose passion for serving those in difficult situations is eye-opening and refreshing.

    Guardians of the Galaxy: A Cinematic Experience

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    GuardiansoftheGalaxy (1)
    October 1, 2014
    “Guardians of the Galaxy” is a surprising action comedy that will keep you on your toes. Think “Star Trek” meets “Star Wars” meets “Iron Man”. This movie has it all: stellar visual effects, great comedic timing, a hint of romance, a killer soundtrack and even scenes from which you will get all “the feels.” This movie has been out since Aug. 2014 and I only wish that I would have gone to see it sooner. Recently Marvel has been topping the charts with movies such as “Thor”, “Iron Man”, “Captain America”, and “The Avengers.” “Guardians of the Galaxy,” starring Chris Pratt, Zoe Saldana, Vin Diesel, and Bradley Cooper is no exception to this blockbuster success. According to Forbes.com, “’Guardians of the Galaxy’ [is] the biggest domestic grosser for a superhero movie not involving Batman, Spider-Man, or Iron Man. It’s also the first Marvel superhero movie to top the weekend box office on four occasions.” With all this success, there is already a release date for the sequel slated for the year 2017. This action/adventure/sci-fi, directed by James Gunn, is about a band of unlikely heroes who come together to save the galaxy from a power hungry villain. Peter Quill (Chris Pratt) is a space junker who has tons of cool gadgets. He finds a mysterious orb in the beginning of the movie and an adventure quickly ensues when he discovers that the orb is wanted by the evil Ronan (Lee Pace). Through unforeseen events, Peter Quill is thrown together with sassy and tough Gamora (Zoe Saldana), lovable Groot (Vin Diesel), hulking and powerful Drax (Dave Bautista), and crude but likable Rocket (Bradley Cooper). They must protect the orb and keep it from falling into the hands of Ronan. This movie is well done and appropriate for all ages. It won’t leave you hanging and has something for everyone to enjoy. Viewers even get blast from the past with the Nova Prime being played by Glenn Close, who starred in “102 Dalmatians” in 2000 as an iconic Cruella DeVil. “Guardians of the Galaxy” is one of the best movies that I have seen in a while, but there were some aspects that did not blow me away. The villain, Ronan, was forgettable to say the least. The scariest thing about him was the fact that he had horrible oral hygiene; his mouth was constantly full of blue ink, as if he had been chewing on the end of a ballpoint pen and it exploded in his mouth. I found him more creepy than scary. The movie also lacked character development. Maybe the sequel will delve more in depth, but as for the first movie, the characters could have been stronger if they would have been explained more and given a bit of a stronger history or explanation of where they came from/what they had been through. Though the movie had a few weaknesses, those were strongly made up for by the rest of the movie. My favorite part about the movie was the comedic timing. The makers of the movie did not leave the audience wanting in the laughter department. The jokes were well done and not too over the top. I am a person who likes to keep an eye out on what’s going on in the background or how the secondary characters are reacting to things — and I was not disappointed. The comedy in this movie was on point from beginning to end. Another point of strength was the visual effects. They were very believable and there was never a point in the movie that was clearly computer animation. In fact, as soon as the movie started, I became lost in the world of spaceships, cyborgs and extraterrestrial creatures that painted the screen in vivid hues. The costumes and makeup were out of this world (no pun intended). Many of the characters were in full body paint; I can only imagine how much fun that would have been to get put on early every day before shooting. Extra shot of espresso, anyone? The movie also has the most amazing soundtrack. The main character Peter Quill is very protective of his mix tape which holds songs such as “Hooked on a Feeling” by Blue Swede, “Cherry Bomb” by The Runaways and “Ain’t no Mountain High Enough” by Marvin Gaye and Tammi Terrell. These songs are utilized at key points in the movie and work well with the action scenes. If you like to jam to oldies, then this soundtrack is for you. Check out a compilation of the songs from the movie; they make a nice soundtrack for cleaning your room or working on homework. Guardians of the Galaxy Soundtrack When the credits started rolling, I was honestly disappointed the movie was over and cannot wait to see the sequel. I would highly recommend this movie to everyone. Go see it while it is still in theaters if you get the chance, you won’t regret it.

    Inspirational movies

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    April 25, 2014
    It’s that time of year. Finals, projects, and summer job hunting are upon us. Here are a few movie suggestions to help motivate you to finish strong. Meet the Robinsons. A little lesser known Disney movie, this time travel adventure will have you feeling like you can conquer the world with the motto, “keep moving forward.” The story of Lewis, an orphan who is also an extremely talented inventor, and who gets into trouble when an evil bowler hat guy, which messes up the space-time continuum. Rocky. We’ve all heard the theme song, but honestly this is a great one to watch in college. An underdog story with a lot of heart, when this came out people left the theaters and ran for miles (or so it is told). A boxer lifts himself up out of the slums with some hard work. Rudy. Another sports movie, but this is also a great motivational story. A guy with virtually no athletic talent and no money gets set on playing football for the university of Notre Dame. Based on a true story, it would seem unbelievable if it didn’t really happen. Princess and the Frog. A girl with her heart set on opening her own restaurant works as hard as she can to achieve her goal. Not even getting turned into a frog can stop her. Plus this has great music, which is an added bonus. August Rush. This is another orphan story about a boy who has a special connection with music. Despite his circumstances, he is passionate, happy, and driven to succeed and follow his dreams.

    Professor John Knox: Teacher, Author, and Servant

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    April 25, 2014
    Biblical Studies Professor John Knox (students call him Knox) arrives to class in a broken-in blue baseball cap and a Doctor Who character shirt. Students in class immediately wrap up their conversations and wait for Knox to begin his lesson. He is infamous for showing video clips highlighting lessons or to create conversations. Not one to hear himself talk, Knox encourages interactions between students. He often asks students to open their Bibles and read the text out loud with a James Earl Jones voice. Knox has been teaching and enriching peoples’ lives at George Fox for ten years. “I have enjoyed working for the past decade at GFU mainly because of the people—students, faculty, administrators—who have consistently demonstrated their love of God, others, and learning,” Knox said. “I sincerely think God has opened doors and used me in His service at GFU, and for that I am grateful.” At the start of this academic year he was asked to be a Visiting Assistant Professor of Biblical Studies.  His PhD focuses on the state of Religiosity in the West and he intends to add to his ever growing portfolio.  Knox is pursuing his other passion–writing.  Last year his fiction novella, The Letter of Alon, was published.  This academic year saw Knox publish three articles in an online Fuller Journal regarding radical individualism in the Pacific Northwest.  His most recent publication was on April 9 in Christ Cascadia entitled “Future Emphasis of the Church in the Pacific Northwest.” When asked about writing Knox smiles. “I loved writing my first novel published in August, The Letter of Alon, and have been working on its sequel as well as a new Christian SciFi novel, too,” Knox said. “It is a joy to utilize all my university learning in my writing—my ultimate goal for each is to produce works that are entertaining, educational, and inspirational.  Once a teacher, always a teacher.” With regard to the classes Knox teaches, they fill up fast and stay that way throughout the semester. His teaching style is engaging, refreshing, entertaining, and honest.  Knox requires students to read, question, and share.  There is no coasting in any of his classes. “If I had to define Knox in two words I would call him ‘unconventionally ingenious.’ Knox is one of the few Bible professors who reminds me every class session why I’m here at Fox,” says junior Jordan Nelson. “He displays the dedication, love of teaching, and love of learning that I’ve come to expect of George Fox professors. His non-traditional methods lead to non-traditional results. His students are not only intrigued by his lessons, but engaged in the Word beyond what one would expect of a standard Bible class or even an insightful sermon. I have a tremendous amount of respect for Professor Knox, a man whose teaching allows students to reach beyond the security of the conventional into the boundless void of new and unexplored knowledge.” As the next academic year approaches, Knox looks forward to the new experiences to come. “Regardless of where the Spirit moves me, like Dr. Seuss said, ‘Don’t cry because it’s over, smile because it happened.’  My GFU friendships and relationships have left a legacy of love in my heart,” Knox said.